10 Things we should have known before going full-time

We’ve lived and traveled in our RV for going on 3 years and absolutely wouldn’t trade it for the world.  Our lifestyle is incredibly amazing.  We’ve been told people want to ‘be us’.  While we adored our previous sticks and bricks home, we love the tiny-house simplicity, liberation and freedom to go when we want and where.  We are blessed with so many people who come into our lives through our travels and remain friends for life.  But that doesn’t say there aren’t things we’ve missed or day dream about that we had living in our former ‘S&B’ (sticks and bricks) home.  We’re being honest here.  In this lifestyle, you trade one for another.

This lifestyle brings a whole new set of challenges.  That military mantra ‘overcome and adapt’ has followed us.  It’s okay though, it’s what makes us stronger to enjoy the reason why we are doing this whole nomadic lifestyle.  We consider ourselves lucky to be doing this but that doesn’t erase some disappointments or things we’d wished to keep.  This is a brutally honest, hearts-on-our-sleeves blog piece.  Don’t think for a minute that we’re complaining but, if you’re ever contemplating a nomadic lifestyle whether it be RVing, sailing, backpacking across the country, etc., you might want to know before cutting the cord:  

  • Soaks, Salts & Suds – I miss my big jetted tub!  I used to take 2-3 baths a week with my favorite soaps, salts and essential oils; whether it be therapeutically or simple relaxation.  Now, I’m lucky to get one every 2-3 months.  If I visit a friend or relative, I always ask, ‘may I?’ and when we get a hotel room, I splurge and get one with a big soaking tub.   

  • Endless Hot Water – It goes with the bathtub soaks.  Admit it, long showers rock…where it meant using the entire water heater tank in our former sticks and bricks, that we could stand in the shower for a good 30 minutes of pulsating hot water on my back and shoulders, but I digress.  Now, our showers are limited to about 5 minutes unless we use the bathhouse where we are parked but then there’s the whole privacy thing. We sacrifice one for the other.

  • Down The Drain – Doing dishes back then was so much simpler with one less step.  Now, we scrape our dishes well or wipe them with a napkin before washing them.  Weird I know, but we watch everything we put down our plumbing and tanks.  If not, we’re in big trouble…perhaps bigger and more costly than when we had our S&B.  On the same note, if we’re not hooked up to sewer, we then are very conscious of how much we put in our gray tanks.  So, even that five minute shower gets cut to about two.
  • Friends and Family – This is probably the biggest ‘low point’ but we try not to dwell or think about it.  Our families are in Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Virginia and elsewhere and Lisa’s best friends are in Florida, Maine, and Kentucky.  We make it a point to fly or drive to see our families and friends.  It takes extra planning because of where we may be parked, who will care for our nomad cats and how we get there.  

  • Forever Neighbors – We knew exactly who had coconut sugar or special spices to borrow from in our former neighborhood.  If a neighbor needed a babysitter, we were always there to help them.  The Early Wyne Ladies gathered every month for Bunco, baby and wedding showers, cooked for sick neighbors, and took care of each other’s neighbors and pets while we would step away on vacations or trips.  We miss the annual Kentucky Derby parties, Halloween Parties at Kim & Jim’s, Christmas Parties at Amy & Paul’s and New Year’s at whomever was bold enough to volunteer.  We’ve even hosted a few.  We miss the neighborhood community we had.  We knew we could depend on each other without worry.  

  • Butcher, Baker and Candlestick Maker – It might sound like a fairy tale we lived in however, this part was important to us.  We got our meats and groceries from our small Kentucky town Country Mart, our pastries and baked goods from The Tea Cup and whatever handcrafts, I bought from locals I knew.  We don’t have that anymore.  I miss it.  But it won’t keep us from not finding the best in the places we visit.  We make talk with the locals wherever we go to find their recommendations. We enjoy visiting Farmer’s Markets everywhere to compensate.  
    Dave & I chatting at our favorite bakery
    the Tea Cup in Taylorsville, Kentucky

  • Girlfriend Dates and Outings – nothing like all my peeps packing into our former home in funny themed pajamas to scrapbook until 4 am, lunch dates at the local cafes, and ‘playing the ponies’ at Churchill Downs with ‘da girls’ at Kentucky Derby time.  But on a good note, I’ve met some fabulous lady friends whom I’ve gotten to know to do ‘girlfriend things’ with on the road.  Some of us have grown extremely close because of what we have in common.   

  • Doctor, Dentist & Chiropractor – They knew us and our health like their own familys’.  They knew our stories and personals.  The knew how to treat without having to go through continuous comprehensive exams every visit.  Our military medical care is perhaps, one of our biggest challenges on the road, but we make it work.  We have to.
  • Our Nomad Cats’ Veterinarian – As with our own Doctor, our fuzzyheads miss Dr. Shelley and the staff at Elk Creek Animal Hospital.  They know them well and have been their patients since they were frisky kittens.  Doc Shelley diagnosed Kandi’s Feline Hyperesthesia and understands her need for separate visits to get her immunizations because of her allergic reactions if taken all together.  He also knows that Krissie is a Prima Donna, loves to be held by him but hates opening her mouth for him.  On a good note, each year we return to Kentucky to get their well-kitty checks and to play with the staff.  

  • Home for the Holidays – Most look at this as a heartbreaker but we make the best of it. I can honestly say, ‘we’re used to it’ because of our former military lifestyle being stationed away from our families. We love the holidays and we love our families.  But because of where they weather, location and time of year, travel is most times difficult, especially when we are parked a couple thousand miles away.  We try to situate ourselves where we may meet with other RVers in the same situation or choose a location near(er) to other family or friends.  Its hard to be alone but really, we’re not.  
    Our ‘RV Family’ OwnLessDoMore‘s Emily & Tim and son, Dane
    joined us for Christmas dinner at Wine Ridge RV Resort
    in Pahrump, NV

So, this is the story many don’t read, hear or “cautioned”; what most full-time RVers won’t talk about.  Its things we need to learn and experience on our own.  Even the coolness of our travels has it’s challenges, but we have two choices.  We can quit and go backwards or we can stand tall, suck in our guts and point our hearts to true north and enjoy the opportunities God has provided us with.

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