RV Television Antenna Upgrade Installation Guide

Rarely do we watch television to begin with except for on rainy days or when we want to watch a game or race. However, it seemed that our over-the-air (OTA) television reception was just not hacking it for us on the days we wanted to take in a game or some program.  Being that we aren’t satellite dish users, we had to do something.

So, after a few days of researching different types of OTA television antennas, we purchased our upgrade from the local Camping World for about $45 however, there’s a few you can purchase on Amazon.

Our Antenna Upgrade

We chose to upgrade from the AntennaTek Signal Commander to the Winegard RVW-205 Sensar IV with Wingman – Replacement (Head Only)

This antenna replacement received great reviews from multiple sources for improved television reception for RVs.  It is available in a black or white finish and can be purchased from several different sources.

This antenna design has been proven to increase the range and reliability of your over the air antenna reception. After all, when the game is on, you want to watch it now.

Winegard Sensar antennas have unsurpassed range, allowing you to watch channels broadcast from up to 55 miles away. The built in amplifier boosts weaker television signals giving you crystal clear reception!

The antenna is powder coated for long lasting durability with over 20 years of experience on RV roofs. Sensar antennas have passed rigorous UV and environmental testing.

The Winegard Sensar IV excels at UHF and receives hard to get VHF digital channels. It’s optimized for digital HD reception. The Sensar antennas can be raised, lowered and rotated from inside your parked RV to pinpoint the exact angle for best reception!

After removing the new antenna from the box, you’ll notice the differences are readily apparent.  The new Winegard Sensar IV antenna has multiple smaller antennas protruding from the front side of the base antenna.  These protrusions aid in improving the antenna’s reception. Our old Antenna Tek Power Commander has just the original base.

Technical Specifications

  • Receives ALL VHF and UHF digital and HD signals.
  • Amplified 75 ohm over-the-air digital and HD ready antenna.
  • Replacement Head Only: Does Not Include Lift Assembly, Wall Plate, Amplifier or Cabling.

Size and Weight (Full Unit)

  • Unit Weight: 6.5 pounds
  • Width: 46.25 inch
  • Depth: 15.25 inch
  • Height: 4 inch Stowed, 30 inch Raised
  • Powder coated for long lasting durability in harsh environmental conditions.

In The Box

  • Sensar IV Replacement Head
  • Printed Documentation

Warranty and Support

  • Warranty: 2 Years Parts, 1 Year Labor
  • Complimentary Telephone and Email Support
  • Online Technical Manuals and Instructions
  • Large Dealer Support Network.

For those of you wondering if the Winegard Sensar IV head will fit on the Antenna Tek masts, it fits perfectly.

Before we start with the installation process, we need to talk about something first…

Getting onto Your Roof

As you know, your RV’s OTA antenna is mounted on the roof which can present an issue if you’re squeemish about going up there or your physically incapable. We realize that getting onto the roof of an RV isn’t for everybody. So, if you’re not up to the task because of fear of heights or its too physically demanding, hire a professional.

But, before anyone climbs up onto your roof, ensure your RV is not located near any low power lines. You surely want to eliminate any chance of electrocution either of yourself or the installer.

Also, we highly recommend wearing non-skid shoes. And be very conscious of your footing while climbing up on or walking on the RV’s roof. Its a good idea to inspect the bottoms of your shoes to ensure no grit or gravel are stuck in the treads before stepping foot on your ladder. You certainly don’t want to rip, gouge or snag your roof’s rubber membrane. If you hire a professional, we see no harm in asking if you can check the bottoms of their shoes before climbing the ladder. Remember, it’s YOUR RV.

Now that we got all that out of the way, let’s make way to the installation.

Tools and Installation

Installation is very basic and only requires a pair of needle nose pliers and a small amount of dielectric tune-up grease (protects electrical connections and wiring from salt, dirt and corrosion).

Before going onto the roof of your RV turn the power off to your antenna booster. Raise the TV antenna about half way up by rotating the handle inside your RV.  Slip the pliers and the new pins and C clips that come with the new antenna into your pocket and carefully climb the ladder of your RV.

Once on the roof, unscrew the coaxial cable from your old antenna. Use the pliers to remove the old C clips and gently pull the old pins from the antenna masts.  Then, remove the old antenna head and discard the old C clips and pins. Place the new Winegard Sensar IV antenna head onto the masts and insert the new pins and C clips. Ensure the new antenna head is positioned properly so you can crank it down to lay flat on your RV’s roof for transit.  Place a small amount of the dielectric grease on the coaxial cable threads and reattach the cable to the new antenna.

Once back inside your RV energized the antenna booster and conduct a new channel search on your television.

Our Assessment

From our installation, we immediately noticed after the new scan for channels an increase of available channels.  We’ve also experienced a much clearer and sharper image with less pixelating. The new Winegard Sensar IV antenna head was simple to replace and a definite upgrade for our television viewing.

Be aware that this is just an enhanced antenna to improve the reception of Digital Signals over the older factory Winegards. If your TV does not have a Digital Tuner, you will still need the set-top box to get digital broadcast.

Again, the antenna replacement can be purchased for about $45.00 and is well worth your time and money. Now we can watch our favorite programs without having to worry about reception.

While you’re on the roof, you may want to read this first…

RV Maintenance Tip #5: RV Roof Maintenance

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